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Dr Stephen Dunne


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Senior Lecturer in Psychology

I obtained a BSc (Hons) in Psychology from the University of Durham in 2009. After taking a year out working as an Assistant Psychologist for a charity providing vocational and community support for brain injury survivors, I started my PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience at Durham in 2010, completing this in November 2014.

My PhD explored the use of monetary rewards on eye movements in neuro-typical human participants extending previously held knowledge regarding the effectiveness of rewards as a tool for behaviour change in neuro-typical populations and the application of reward-based training for sufferers of visual field deficits such as hemianopia.

From 2014 to 2018, I worked at Durham University as a postdoctoral researcher developing, disseminating and conducting research using an app to help compensate for visual loss associated with stroke. 

My involvement with the development and implementation of rehabilitation paradigms for stroke survivors with visual loss has led me to question how factors such as motivation, competition and goal-setting can be manipulated to improve patient outcome. At best these psycho-social factors in rehabilitation are poorly evidenced and at worst, non-existent. My research aims to understand the interaction between concepts such as competition, collaboration, motivation, reward and goal-setting in order to apply these findings to patient populations. 

I am a member of the Experimental Psychology Society, the British Psychological Society and a fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Teaching and supervision

I teach on the following modules:

  • PSY145 Introduction to Clinical Psychology
  • PSY270 Assessment, Formulation and Evidence-Based Practice
  • PSY340 Mental Health and Illness
  • PSY381 Professional Practice
  • PSY382 Patient Engagement and Reflective Practice
  • PSYM66 Everyday Motivations and Biases

Research interests for potential research students

I am interested in projects that utilise behaviour change paradigms on neuro-typical populations in order to unearth any potential effects of such paradigms on visual behaviour. In this way, results could be used to uncover potentially beneficial strategies that can be applied to patients with visual loss improving quality of life.

Research

My main research interest is clinical neuropsychology, specifically clinical rehabilitation and vision. I am involved in investigating compensatory interventions for sufferers of visual field defects. I am interested in utilising behaviour change paradigms on neuro-typical populations in order to unearth any potential effects of such paradigms on visual behaviour. In this way, results could be used to uncover potentially beneficial strategies that can be applied to patients with visual loss following stroke or brain injury.

More generally, I am also interested in factors that affect quality of life in these populations (loneliness, group support, social interaction).

Publications

Number of items: 5.

Article

Dunne, Stephen, Close, Helen, Richards, Nicola, Ellison, Amanda and Lane, Alison R. (2020) Maximizing Telerehabilitation for Patients With Visual Loss After Stroke: Interview and Focus Group Study With Stroke Survivors, Carers, and Occupational Therapists. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22 (10). ISSN 1438-8871

Dunne, Stephen, Ellison, Amanda and Smith, Daniel (2019) The Limitations of Reward Effects on Saccade Latencies: An Exploration of Task-Specificity and Strength. Vision, 3 (20). pp. 1-17. ISSN 2411-5150

Yeates, Giles, Rowberry, Michelle, Dunne, Stephen, Goshawk, Michelle, Mahadevan, Mythreyi, Tyerman, Ruth, Salter, Mandy, Hillier, Martin, Berry, Alister and Tyerman, Andy (2016) Social cognition and executive functioning predictors of supervisors’ appraisal of interpersonal behaviour in the workplace following acquired brain injury. NeuroRehabilitation, 38 (3). pp. 299-310. ISSN 1053-8135

Dunne, Stephen, Ellison, Amanda and Smith, Daniel, T. (2015) Rewards have a transient and task-specific effect on saccade latency. Frontiers in Psychology, 6 (1080). ISSN 1664-1078

Book Section

Ellison, Amanda, Dunne, Stephen and Lane, Alison R. (2020) Real-world applications in vision and attention: How to help patients find their (golf) balls again. In: Progress in Brain Research. Progress in Brain Research, 253 . Elsevier. ISBN 9780128207239

This list was generated on Sun Sep 26 18:52:17 2021 BST.
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Vision
  • Stroke
  • Brain Injury
  • Visual Loss in Stroke/Brain Injury
  • Rehabilitation
  • Reward Learning

Last updated 07 May 2021

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