Jump to accessibility statement Skip to content
ReciteMe accessibility toolbar button

Dr Deborah Bell


Home / About / Academic staff profiles / Teacher Training and Education / Deborah Bell

Lecturer MA Education and MA International Education

I am Assistant Programme Leader on MA Education and MA International Education (DL). I am also a personal academic tutor for International Teacher Education (ITE) in the Faculty of Education and Society.

I completed a PGCE in Post Compulsory Education and Training and professional doctorate at University of Sunderland.

Prior to this, I have worked for the University of Sunderland for over 20 years in various roles.



Teaching and supervision

  • MA Education (DL) Module Leader EPDM83
  • MA Education (DL) Module Leader EPDM95
  • Dissertation Supervisor for MA Education
  • Personal Academic Tutor International Teacher Education
  • Second supervisor for Professional Doctorate students

Research interests for potential research students

My research interests include support mechanisms for distance learning students and, in particular, the role of the personal academic tutor. In addition, my doctoral thesis explored communities of practice within education. I also have an interest in insider research and the impact of communication within the working environment.

Research

My research interests include support mechanisms for distance learning students. I am currently working collaboratively on a paper exploring support mechanisms for students. I also have an interest in insider research and the impact of communication within the working environment.

My professional doctorate was titled Collapsing Hierarchies and Dissolving Dichotomies in Higher Education through Subject Specific Communities of Practice. The research examined the working relationships between academic and administrative staff in a Higher Education Institution (HEI) in England. There have been numerous changes within HEIs, including the rise of neo-liberalist philosophy which has brought about high levels of surveillance and top-down bureaucratic approaches to quality improvement. The findings demonstrated that the rationale behind administrative and academic staff operating in two separate silos is not only questionable, but also limiting in opening up collaborative and cooperative opportunities for improved productivity. The research concludes that subject communities of practice possess the potential to dissolve dichotomies and collapse hierarchies between the academic and administrative staff.

  • Role of communities of practice in education
  • Support systems for students in education
  • Qualitative research in education
  • Role of Personal Academic Tutor

Last updated 28 September 2022