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Global platform for Sunderland’s diabetes research

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Published on 13 April 2021

ADIT (Advances in Diabetes and Insulin Therapy) conference
ADIT (Advances in Diabetes and Insulin Therapy) conference

Diabetes research showcased at a global conference has highlighted how scientific findings are transferring from the lab at the University of Sunderland and having real-world impact that’s benefiting people’s health and wellbeing. 

Presenting alongside world-leading experts at the ADIT (Advances in Diabetes and Insulin Therapy) conference for healthcare practitioners working in diabetes management and treatment, Dr Matthew Campbell was able to feature his own related work at the University. 

ADIT has a global reach attracting delegates from over 30 countries, and this year’s virtual event highlighted key scientific advances and breakthrough research from a panel of globally recognised experts with a focus on translating research to clinical practice. 

Dr Campbell, Principal Investigator in Human Metabolism in the Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing, has published extensively around diabetes and glucose regulation and is currently involved in a study, funded by Diabetes UK, into improving the health of people with Type 1 Diabetes with a simple lifestyle change, breaking up prolonged sitting with short frequent bouts of light-intensity walking. 

Sue Brent, Head of the School of Nursing and Health Sciences, commented: “It is rewarding to see our academics are at the forefront of advancing the knowledge of healthcare professionals, and in particular supporting them to improve the lives of patients with diabetes. Our research, collaborations and cutting-edge facilities at the University of Sunderland, enable our research community to promote excellence in patient care and clinical practice." 

Diabetes research showcased at a global conference has highlighted how scientific findings are transferring from the lab at the University of Sunderland and having real-world impact that’s benefiting people’s health and wellbeing. 

Drawing on his recent research - personalising exercise recommendations - Dr Campbell, who also serves an ADIT Executive Scientific Board Member, says: “Covid-19 has shone a harsh light on health inequalities in societies across the globe.

People living with diabetes are disproportionately affected by the virus and it is now more important than ever that our healthcare professionals are supported in offering excellent diabetes care. 

“The ADIT update 2021 has provided a unique and unrivalled opportunity for diabetes healthcare professionals to benefit from continuous medical education and join a global community and network of diabetes professionals. This event demonstrates that the University of Sunderland is a now a key global player in diabetes healthcare professional education.  

“Continued working with the AGADA institute through ADIT and other diabetes care initiatives is a clear statement that the University is society shaping and a powerful advocate for addressing global challenges.” 

The AGADA Diabetes Education & Research Institute is a globally reaching European based non-profit medical scientific association. The institute is dedicated to encouraging and supporting high-quality diabetes education and research and promoting excellence in patient care and clinical practice.  

Director at AGADA, Dusa Bolcina, said: “The primary mission of the AGADA institute is to improve diabetes patient care through continued medical education. For more than a decade, the institute has been realising this goal through ADIT – an internationally leading scientific meeting for healthcare professionals working in diabetes. This year, we held ADIT update 2021 which was our first virtual Scientific Meeting that brought together delegates from all over the globe to participate in a world-class scientific programme.” 

Topics at this year's conference included: 

  • Reversing type 2 diabetes: Prof Roy Taylor, Newcastle University 

  • Ketogenic diets: Dr Panu Luukkonen, Yale University USA 

  • Diabetes and eating disorders: Prof Aila Rissanen, University of Helsinki, Finland 

  • Fatty liver disease in diabetes: Prof Hannele Yki-Järvinen, University of Helsinki, Finland 

  • Pharmacological incretin therapies: Prof Filip Knop, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, & Prof Juris Meier Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany 

  • Insulin therapy: Prof Geremia Bolli, Perugia University, Italy 

  • SGLT-2 inhibitors: Prof Guntram Schernthaner, University of Vienna, Austria 

  • Diabetes and obesity in the Covid-19 era:Dr Dario Rahelic, University of Zagreb, Croatia. 

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