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Case Study

Chris Hunter

Newcastle-Upon-Tyne

BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care

MSc Inequality and Society


Chris Hunter had been working in retail for 17 years when he decided to quit his job for a new challenge. After completing a course at a local college he continued his studies, enrolling onto BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care here at the University of Sunderland. Since graduating Chris has started our MSc Inequality and Society course whilst also volunteering as a researcher at a local human rights-based charity. He plans to pursue a career in human rights or social justice.

After 17 years of working in retail I decided that I needed a new challenge, so I quit my job and enrolled onto a Health and Social Care course at college. When I was near the end of the course it was suggested I apply to university which I laughed off at the time as I thought my academic time was behind me. I attended an open day and was impressed by the passion of the staff and the broad age range of people attending the open day. The age range made me feel relieved that I would not be the only older student on my course.

The best aspects of the course are multiple. The passion and knowledge of the lecturers is immense and infectious. As I walked nervously into my first lecture, not really knowing what I was getting myself into, I wasn’t sure that university was going to be right for me. An hour later, after a lecture on Social Problems, I knew it was. I knew it was going to be engaging and would expand on, and give credence to, my own life experiences. Another fantastic aspect is meeting so many inspiring new people; although this certainly includes the lecturers, I have been fortunate to make some great friends who I have no doubt will be part of my life for years to come.

The modules on the Health and Social Care course are fascinating and involve many different aspects of contemporary life. Highlights from each year include Social Problems, Medicalisation, Normality of the body, and Global Health; all modules where the knowledge of health and social care students is enhanced by sociology and criminology students, complementing the learning process.

Since graduating I have embarked on a masters degree – MSc Inequality and Society at the University of Sunderland – whilst volunteering as a researcher at a local human rights-based charity. I hope to start a new career in human rights or social justice once I graduate.

If I was going to give any advice to prospective students I would say engage with everyone: lecturers, support staff, library staff, security, cleaners and your fellow students. Take the time to explore the campuses and utilise every aspect of them. Read! Attend every seminar and lecture to maximise your knowledge. Attend public lectures and talks. And read some more!

My time at Sunderland has been inspiring – if I could do it all again, I wouldn’t hesitate. The University has guided me from being an average school student who managed six GCSE’s at C or above, and one A-level, to graduating as a first-class honours student, something I wouldn’t have thought possible as a nervous new student on my first day.”

Published 18 September 2020

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